Uncategorized – Dan Harding Art http://danhardingart.com/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 04:58:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://danhardingart.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Uncategorized – Dan Harding Art http://danhardingart.com/ 32 32 L’Officiel organizes Art Basel bash as he is sued for stiffness of freelancers https://danhardingart.com/lofficiel-organizes-art-basel-bash-as-he-is-sued-for-stiffness-of-freelancers/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 01:50:00 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/lofficiel-organizes-art-basel-bash-as-he-is-sued-for-stiffness-of-freelancers/ Luxury fashion magazine L’Officiel may be sued by New York City for failing to pay its freelancers, but that didn’t stop the magazine from throwing a big party during Art Week Miami. On Thursday, the NY Times reported that the US version of the French fashion magazine was being sued by New York City on […]]]>

Luxury fashion magazine L’Officiel may be sued by New York City for failing to pay its freelancers, but that didn’t stop the magazine from throwing a big party during Art Week Miami.

On Thursday, the NY Times reported that the US version of the French fashion magazine was being sued by New York City on behalf of two dozen freelance writers, including “writers, producers, photographers, illustrators and more,” who “Stated that they were not paid for their work, or not paid in a timely manner.

One of them, Dean Quigley, a contractual art director, owes more than $ 15,000. Freelance writer Natasha Stagg owes $ 1,000.

Department of Consumer and Worker Protection Commissioner Peter Hatch told the newspaper: “If such a company has the resources to maintain a luxurious corporate image, it is all the more unreasonable for it not to not pay the real creators of the content it sells.

And by maintaining this image, they are. On Monday, the magazine celebrated its Art and Design issue at the chic Miami Beach Edition hotel.

Stefano Tonchi, Global Creative Director, mingled and posed for photos with the final issue of the evening, which was hosted by artist Leo Villareal, and included guests like artists Camilla Webster, Shawn Kolodny and Nicole Salmasi.

The lawsuit asks freelancers to be paid double their wages owed. And, according to the NY Times, “civil penalties paid to New York City and the establishment of a judicial monitor to ensure L’Officiel changes its practices.”

By bringing together 24 workers in the lawsuit, Hatch says it brings the first substantial “model practice case” to New York City, made possible by the Freelance Isn’t Free Act of 2017.


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Bea Bonafini channels centuries-old painting traditions into fresh tapestries and sculptures https://danhardingart.com/bea-bonafini-channels-centuries-old-painting-traditions-into-fresh-tapestries-and-sculptures/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/bea-bonafini-channels-centuries-old-painting-traditions-into-fresh-tapestries-and-sculptures/ Elsewhere, Bonafini used rugs to create three-dimensional bodies captured in the middle of the dive, which seemed to guide visitors from room to room, ending up in the gallery’s basement. The effect was similar to walking through a painting coming to life, as if one or was unwrapped in a three-bedroom duplex. “I have thought […]]]>
Elsewhere, Bonafini used rugs to create three-dimensional bodies captured in the middle of the dive, which seemed to guide visitors from room to room, ending up in the gallery’s basement. The effect was similar to walking through a painting coming to life, as if one or was unwrapped in a three-bedroom duplex.

“I have thought a lot about the collective unconscious,” says Bonafini of his current work. She recently showed Renata Fabbri again with her exhibition “Full Moon (Empty Stomach)”, which exploited mythological and prehistoric themes and blurred the lines between the human and animal worlds. There were large scale textiles, like the 6.5 foot by 13 foot I carry you inside me (2021), whose intarsia encrustation shows the skeletal carcass of a sea creature midway through uptake or uptake by another species.

Other works are about as close to traditional canvases as Bonafini gets: pastel on textured cardboard, cork engraved and filled with gouache and colored pencils. Yet they feel like they are part of something bigger, like the fragments of an ancient fresco unearthed at an archaeological site. In Prey, pray (2021), a virgin with golden hair, her braid resembling a scorpion tail, looks up in the ecstasy of prayer or in the agony of suffocation as a pair of claws clench her throat . The rational instinct is to turn away. The visceral compulsion is to keep looking.


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POP Art Academy painting a broad shot of hope for the youth of Philly https://danhardingart.com/pop-art-academy-painting-a-broad-shot-of-hope-for-the-youth-of-philly/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 22:45:06 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/pop-art-academy-painting-a-broad-shot-of-hope-for-the-youth-of-philly/ POP Art Academy painting a broad shot of hope for the youth of Philly Two female partners teach children to be creative while children learn to unlock new attitudes with their art. WEST PHILADELPHIA – The Power of Painting Art Academy is doing its part to save our streets. One Sunday, several children, who have […]]]>

The Power of Painting Art Academy is doing its part to save our streets.

One Sunday, several children, who have never met, gathered around brushes and good vibes in West Philadelphia.

For three years, Vanessa Young and her business partner have offered children difficult neighborhoods to come and create.

“Teisha and I are both using our skills,” Young said. “She with therapy and wellness and I with my talent for art and just connecting with kids to show them different career paths. While a lot of kids know they can be artists, the one of those young black boys could be the next Virgil Abloh and become a billionaire just because of their artistic skills. “

Nykira Murray, 12, said she felt like a free spirit when she had a brush in her hand. She focuses on her masterpieces and this helps calm the violence of the outside world.

“I just lost a cousin of mine to gun violence,” Murray explained. “It helps me a lot to make sure everything is okay. It teaches me that even if you live near the street, you don’t always have to grow up on the street or adopt the way of life.”

Young helped a student go beyond the canvas. Aaron Burke, 10, has started his own clothing brand called Aaron Athletic Apparel.

“It’s really for my love of the sport and I want people to have healthy lifestyles,” Burke remarked. “Really buy hoodies that don’t cost between $ 60 and $ 100.”

Aiden Darcisse is a 14-year-old councilor who says it’s important to have spaces like this in the city’s red zones.

“I try to tell parents that their children can come here and feel safe,” Darcisse said. “They can have friends and develop a positive energy around them.”

The perfect moment for Vanessa is seeing the children’s faces turn into a smile and their confidence take power.

“They are taught coping skills, conflict resolution skills, alternative ways of making money so that they don’t have to engage in a certain life of crime or violence,” he said. she added.

Show that these children are born with a love in their hearts that can turn into something beautiful with the right palette of care.

“Be powerful, be strong and hold your head up,” Murray said. “You are the most powerful person in the world.”

The POP Art Academy painting a broad line… to save our streets.

They have an art show on Saturday December 4th at the 49th and Pentridge. It’s their annual Fundraising with children’s artwork.

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Masahiro Sakurai features tapestries and flyers advertising Super Smash Bros. Ultimate in stores https://danhardingart.com/masahiro-sakurai-features-tapestries-and-flyers-advertising-super-smash-bros-ultimate-in-stores/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 14:43:45 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/masahiro-sakurai-features-tapestries-and-flyers-advertising-super-smash-bros-ultimate-in-stores/ It’s been almost 3 years since Super Smash Bros. Ultimate was released on Nintendo Switch. Since then, the plant Piranha, Joker from Persona 5, Hero from Dragon Quest, Banjo-Kazooie, Terry Bogard from Fatal Fury, Byleth from Fire Emblem: Three Houses, Min Min from ARMS, Steve from Minecraft, Sephiroth from Final Fantasy 7, Pyra & Mythra […]]]>

It’s been almost 3 years since Super Smash Bros. Ultimate was released on Nintendo Switch. Since then, the plant Piranha, Joker from Persona 5, Hero from Dragon Quest, Banjo-Kazooie, Terry Bogard from Fatal Fury, Byleth from Fire Emblem: Three Houses, Min Min from ARMS, Steve from Minecraft, Sephiroth from Final Fantasy 7, Pyra & Mythra from Xenoblade Chronicles 2, Kazuya from Tekken and Sora from Kingdom Hearts have been added to the game. As such, the final player count for the game is 86.

Despite the time that has passed since Super Smash Bros. Ultimate has become a buyable product, the crossover platform brawler continues to sell (25.71 million in sales as of September 30, 2021) and continues to be a game worth announcing in stores. Masahiro Sakurai recently visited a few stores and highlighted the commercials he saw for the game he was the director of.

“I’ve been to Yodobashi Camera (a Japanese department store) in Akihabara and also Umeda’s and they both have Super Smash Bros. full roster tapestries,” Sakurai said. “Obviously the response has been very positive.”

“To come here and see it exhibited like that is great! Sakurai continued in his Tweet. “It shows a lot of games and franchises so I think the effect is very good overall.”

It looks like fans can even buy flyers in stores to take home. Of course, Sakurai collected leaflets for himself and took pictures of them as well.

“Besides, if you go there, you can get this flyer,” Sakurai noted. “It’s a full frame scroll with all the characters! “

Masahiro Sakurai Smash Ads images image # 1

Photos of Masahiro Sakurai on Smash ads image # 2

Masahiro Sakurai pictures from the Smash commercials image # 3

Images of Masahiro Sakurai's Smash ads, image # 4

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The task of creating and updating the “Everyone’s Here” mural that fans know so well fell to Yusuke Nakano. Since there are so many characters present here, Nakano had to spend some time thinking about where to position each character.

“The fighters from Smash Bros. are all main characters, so I didn’t focus them around the center, but spread them around the artwork,” Nakano said. “The theme was that no matter what part you reframed, there would be sights to see.”

Masahiro Sakurai originally wanted this mural to highlight and advertise the size of the list at events and shops. It appears that the final version of the mural (which includes Sora) is still used for this purpose.

You’d think Masahiro Sakurai would be a little tired of seeing Super Smash Bros. considering how he’s basically spent the last 10 years of his life focusing on the “continuing development” going from Super Smash Bros. 4 in Super Smash Bros. DLC. Ultimate. .

However, it seems that isn’t actually the case for Sakurai and he apparently even thinks Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is the “work of a lifetime” (as mentioned in Kazuya’s presentation). Sakurai even framed the legendary mural on his wall at home.

Despite the time that has passed since the release of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, it looks like the game will still be around to some extent for quite a while.

Special thanks to Nicholas ‘MajinTenshinhan’ Taylor for his translations and contributions used in this article.


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Alice Waters helps museum meet the tastes of art lovers https://danhardingart.com/alice-waters-helps-museum-meet-the-tastes-of-art-lovers/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 20:25:32 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/alice-waters-helps-museum-meet-the-tastes-of-art-lovers/ LOS ANGELES – As The Hammer Museum comes out of closure from last year’s pandemic, it has assembled a range of big names who it hopes will draw crowds to its campus down the street from the l ‘University of California at Los Angeles: Cézanne, Manet, Monet, Toulouse-Lautrec. And the Waters. It would be Alice […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – As The Hammer Museum comes out of closure from last year’s pandemic, it has assembled a range of big names who it hopes will draw crowds to its campus down the street from the l ‘University of California at Los Angeles: Cézanne, Manet, Monet, Toulouse-Lautrec. And the Waters.

It would be Alice Waters, the restaurateur who founded Chez Panisse in Berkeley 50 years ago and who helped define modern California cuisine. She lends her name and reputation to Lulu, a new restaurant she helped open in the Cour du Marteau, the first time she has partnered so closely with a restaurant since the opening of Chez Panisse.

“This will bring people who might not be museum enthusiasts to the museum,” said Ann Philbin, executive director of Hammer, who recruited Ms. Waters for the project. “This is cross-pollination of audiences.”

The Hammer, which is affiliated with UCLA, is the latest in a long line of arts institutions that collaborate with top conductors in hopes of expanding their audiences. And Ms. Waters is the latest in a long line of famous restaurateurs (for the record, she hates the expression, preferring the French “restauratrice”) to lend her name to a cultural institution.

But while institutions like the Hammer face the challenges of trying to emerge from the pandemic, these types of partnerships, which were once a pleasure for patrons spending an afternoon in a museum or an evening in a concert hall. , take on a new urgency.

The past 20 months have shown that an opera, a play or an art exhibition can be enjoyed from a living room. Food, on the other hand, can’t be streamed, and museums see evidence of that in the lines of people claiming a table at their upscale restaurants.

“People told me they came because they heard about the restaurant, and when they walked through the museum lobby, they were excited by what they saw and came back,” said Gary Tinterow, director of the Museum of Fine Arts. , Houston, which this year opened Le Jardinier, an ambitious and acclaimed French restaurant with a menu overseen by Alain Verzeroli, a Michelin-starred chef.

Gone are the days when museums outsourced restaurants to innocuous food companies that served bland food in the cafeteria – think tuna sandwiches on white, wrapped in plastic.

In New York, restaurateur Danny Meyer opened The Modern at the Museum of Modern Art more than 15 years ago, convinced that high culture and high gastronomy shared some of the same clientele and could function under the same roof.

“At best, we play a supporting actor role,” Meyer said in an interview. “But we hope to be a great version of a supporting actor.”

Restaurants and entertainment have always been in tacit competition for discretionary consumer spending. And if statistics are any guide, Americans love to eat more than they love a trip to a museum, opera, theater, or concert. The average household spent $ 3,526 in restaurants in 2019, the year before the pandemic, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, about $ 500 more than it spent on the broad category of entertainment .

So nowadays one of the first calls for any new museum or concert hall is for a big name conservator. Rembrandt is doing well; Michelin may be better.

At the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which recently opened in Los Angeles, one of the main draws was Fanny’s, the downstairs restaurant run by Bill Chait, one of the biggest names in fine dining in Los Angeles, which has helped create such popular dining venues. like République and Bestia. “It has been thrilled from the start,” said Bill Kramer, director of the museum.

The museum’s restaurants, once hidden away in basements or corners, now often have their own separate entrances, so they can operate even when the museum is closed. Modern in New York was a pioneer in this regard, Meyer said. “Before that,” he said, “the restaurant was always seen as a facility for museum enthusiasts.”

Before the pandemic, the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco hired Deuki Hong, an experienced chef at Momofuku Noodle Bar and Jean-Georges in New York City, to work with the Boba Guys, a popular supplier of bubble milk tea from San Francisco, at the new restaurant on Sundays at the Museum.

“The Asian Art Museum could have chosen a cafeteria account,” said Andrew Chau, one of the founders of Boba Guys. “They wanted to try something different. Food is culture.

The lunch crowd doubled before the pandemic closed and is now slowly coming back.

“We started looking for a new chef for our cafe as part of our multi-year transformation project in 2017,” said Jay Xu, executive director of the Asian Art Museum. “Part of that, of course, was growing our audience. “

Similar collaborations are underway at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Music Center in Los Angeles, home to the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. But few have garnered as much interest as Alice Waters at the Hammer.

For Ms. Waters, who is 77, the decision to venture out of Berkeley is a bit of a reinvention, and a bit of a risk. Despite all its praise, Chez Panisse came under fierce criticism in 2019 from Soleil Ho, the food critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, who argued that his approach had become obsolete. “Chez Panisse took the culinary conversation forward in this country, but seems to have stopped since then,” she wrote.

Ms Waters seems to be aware that her reputation is a double-edged sword.

“I don’t want people to have such expectations,” she said recently in front of a glass jar of mint tea in Lulu, named after the late Lulu Peyraud, a wine matriarch and Provencal cook. who had been his mentor. “I want them to know that they can always eat something simple, seasonal and delicious. “

Ms Waters designed the restaurant and recruited as chef David Tanis, a longtime Chez Panisse collaborator, who writes a monthly column for the Food section of the New York Times. She personally oversaw many details, until deciding what kind of wood (from a buna) should be used for the tables scattered around Lulu’s spacious terrace.

Mr Tanis said they expected most of their initial guests to be museum visitors. But he said he and Waters were convinced that the restaurant, given its aspirations and where it came from, would appeal to residents of Los Angeles, a city known for its vibrant and adventurous dining scene, as well as faculty, staff. and university students. , 10 minutes walk.

“The people who come here as a destination – and the people who visit the museum and want to have lunch,” he said. “We are not aiming for gastronomy. It’s not going to be fancy.

Its menu includes a $ 45, three-course prix fixe lunch menu that began, in a recent example, with a salad of fennel, radish, and arugula, followed by a cod, Dungeness crab and seafood stew. Japanese clams, and ended with olive oil with walnuts. pomegranate cake. Dinner service will begin next year.

The restaurant is part of an ambitious renovation project underway at the Hammer, which announced a $ 180 million fundraising campaign in 2018 to expand the gallery space and bolster its endowment. Ms Philbin, who ate regularly at Panisse, turned to Ms Waters for advice.

“I know you know chefs all over the country,” recalls Ms. Philbin. “She came up with two names and said, ‘I’ll contact them and talk to them.’ A few weeks later, I got an email from her saying, “I haven’t contacted them yet because I have another idea: I might be thinking of myself.” I could not believe it. I was like, are you kidding me?

Ms Waters had always said no when asked by other museums if she could open a restaurant. “It is about my will to lead a civilized life,” she said. “And it’s not on a plane flying to my restaurant in New York.”

It seemed different. Los Angeles isn’t that far from Berkeley, and she has a daughter who lives here.

These collaborations have not always been successful. An attempt to open an upscale restaurant at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has been abandoned. A Meyer restaurant at Whitney in New York, Untitled, did not survive the pandemic and was turned into a cafe.

But they have also become a source of hope for the institutions.

The Los Angeles Music Center turned to Ray Garcia, the chef of the now-closed Broken Spanish, to open a restaurant at the Walt Disney Concert Hall. “A well-known conductor will bring more people to campus,” said Rachel Moore, President of the Music Center.

Mr Garcia said the collaboration would be a boon for the center – and the restaurant.

“A high tide lifts all the boats,” he said. “Anyone can gain exposure. “


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Former deputies. Institute of Art curator Robert Jacobsen dies; was an expert in asian art https://danhardingart.com/former-deputies-institute-of-art-curator-robert-jacobsen-dies-was-an-expert-in-asian-art/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 21:41:22 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/former-deputies-institute-of-art-curator-robert-jacobsen-dies-was-an-expert-in-asian-art/ Tom DeBiaso was dean of the Minneapolis College of Art and Design when a 12th-century piece of Chinese ceramics housed in his office mysteriously broke. Robert Jacobsen, the curator of Asian art at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, heard of the fall and immediately ran. “He reassured me that it wasn’t the end of art […]]]>

Tom DeBiaso was dean of the Minneapolis College of Art and Design when a 12th-century piece of Chinese ceramics housed in his office mysteriously broke. Robert Jacobsen, the curator of Asian art at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, heard of the fall and immediately ran.

“He reassured me that it wasn’t the end of art history, and then he started telling me stories,” DeBiaso recalls. “He told me it was probably done by a farmer who did it in his spare time.”

They managed to restore the room, but Jacobsen’s timely help remained with DeBiaso.

“He was that kind of person who cared about work. But he also cared about friends and friendships,” DeBiaso said.

Giant of the Asian art world and champion of the Twin Cities artistic community, Jacobsen died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on Wednesday. He was 77 years old.

“He’s taught people to love Asian art,” said Susan Jacobsen (who is not related to the late conservative), Mia’s former director of public programming. “He knew how to explain the history of Asian art to a Western audience.

He was hired as Acting Curator of Asian Art at Mia in 1977, when such a department did not exist. He went on to become the founding curator of Asian art, making Mia one of the world’s leading custodians of Chinese art while developing a close relationship with museum trustees Bruce and Ruth Dayton. They, in turn, donated millions to expand the museum’s collections, including Tibetan, Cambodian, Islamic and Indian artefacts, filling 22 galleries.

When Jacobsen retired in 2010, he had expanded the collection of 900 pieces of bronze and Japanese prints to 14,500 items, including a 400-year-old Ming Dynasty reception hall and a study by a scholar of the Ch’ing dynasty of 1797. Jacobsen has written over 30 books, produced and narrated a six-part series on Chinese art for Twin Cities public television, and has lectured over 300.

But he wasn’t always an Asian art fanatic and stumbled across his life’s work. After obtaining a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Minnesota, he went to study art in New Zealand. On his way back to the United States, he visits Japan and quickly falls in love with the country’s architecture and art.

He pursued a doctorate in Asian art history at U, with a minor in Chinese language and literature. He also studied at the National Palace Museum in Taiwan.

In 1987-88, Jacobsen organized a major exhibition of contemporary Chinese artist Wucius Wong in Mia, a milestone for an American museum.

“Not many people realize Bob’s foresight in doing so,” said Pat Hui, director of the now-closed Hui Arts Gallery, which featured artists from Hong Kong, Taiwan and mainland China.

After the normalization of Sino-US relations in the mid-1980s, interest skyrocketed. He started working with the Daytons to expand the collection, especially in Chinese art.

“Bob was a trusted mentor and guide to my grandfather for decades as they worked together to make Mia’s Chinese art collection one of the finest in America,” said Eric Dayton. . “The museum’s extraordinary Asian galleries are a legacy of their friendship and are a lasting testament to Bob’s scholarship and expertise.”

When Mia’s former manager, Evan Maurer, went on sick leave in 2004, Jacobsen and COO Pat Grazzini ran the museum. Jacobsen helped oversee two major renovations at Mia, including a three-year, $ 50 million expansion that opened in 2006. His work led to the University of Minnesota awarding him its Award of Excellence. (One of her farewell gifts is a collection of 10,000 China Studies slides, which will eventually be digitized.)

Jacobsen, who grew up in Roseville, met his wife Patricia in the late 1970s. They were married in a Buddhist-style ceremony. She remembers her travels to China, Korea, Japan, Indonesia, on the Silk Road through Afghanistan and Pakistan, some of which accompanied her.

“In the early 1980s, we were on a tour of one of Beijing’s national museums,” she said. “It turned out that he knew more about their history than the people who worked there because they had been loyal to the Cultural Revolution, and they asked him to stay and work.”

Besides his wife, Jacobsen is survived by his brother Gary and his sister-in-law Mary Anne of Stillwater; sister Kathy Frydenlund and brother-in-law Robert of New Richmond, Wisconsin; brother-in-law Tom Thunnell; a niece; and three nephews.

No service will be held. In lieu of commemorations, donations can be made to the Robert D. Jacobsen Memorial Fund at the University of Minnesota Foundation, or by mail to PO Box 860266, Minneapolis, MN 55486.



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A curator allegedly created unauthorized art NFTs by Anish Kapoor and others. Now he can get slapped with legal action https://danhardingart.com/a-curator-allegedly-created-unauthorized-art-nfts-by-anish-kapoor-and-others-now-he-can-get-slapped-with-legal-action/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 22:28:57 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/a-curator-allegedly-created-unauthorized-art-nfts-by-anish-kapoor-and-others-now-he-can-get-slapped-with-legal-action/ Will artists wage war on Art Wars over unauthorized NFT sales? Ben Moore, a London-based curator, is the founder of Art Wars, a long-term project consisting of an ongoing exhibition of life-size works Star wars stormtrooper helmets which have been custom painted by artists including Anish Kapoor, David Bailey, Jake and Dinos Chapman, and Mr. […]]]>

Will artists wage war on Art Wars over unauthorized NFT sales?

Ben Moore, a London-based curator, is the founder of Art Wars, a long-term project consisting of an ongoing exhibition of life-size works Star wars stormtrooper helmets which have been custom painted by artists including Anish Kapoor, David Bailey, Jake and Dinos Chapman, and Mr. Brainwash. Now Moore has angered many of these artists by selling NFTs derived from photographs of these originals on OpenSea, allegedly without their permission.

“For the first and only time, these iconic images, along with a new set of interpretations of famous digital artists and our own in-house artists, will be available as a collection of 1,138 unique and individual NFT ArtWars. . These will be randomly awarded to buyers of the initial mint, ”according to a statement posted on the Art Wars website.

Moore did not immediately respond to Artnet News’ request for comment. A dozen artists are considering legal action against the project, according to the Financial Time.

An NFT, or non-fungible token, is a unique digital token encrypted with an artist’s signature and individually identified on a blockchain, effectively verifying the rightful owner and authenticity of the creation. Since the NFTs took the art world by storm in early 2020, they have also opened the floodgates to potential – and so far difficult to control – wrongdoing regarding issues of authenticity, legal rights. author and outright theft.

More than 1,600 ETH (nearly $ 7 million) had been transferred since the collection of 1,138 images went on sale on November 22, FT reports. An NFT assigned to Kapoor was offered for 1,000 ETH ($ 4.3 million) but has since been removed from the site. Another work attributed to Bailey was priced at 120 ETH ($ 517,000).

OpenSea could not be reached for comment, but said it received and complied with a notice of copyright infringement. The Art Wars NFT page on OpenSea was deleted yesterday.

Asked for comment, Kapoor’s studio referred the query to the UK’s Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS), which is handling media inquiries on the matter.

“DACS is investigating on behalf of a number of our member artists to ensure their rights are respected and protected,” Representative Kate Rosser-Frost wrote in an email to Artnet News.

The DACS statement continued, “As the art market evolves with new and emerging technologies such as NFTs, we must ensure that we protect both the creative, intellectual and moral rights of artists. Striking NFT without the artists’ permission has the potential to destroy the way we, as a society, value creativity and, as part of that, ensure that artists are protected by existing intellectual property laws and mechanisms such as the artist’s resale right.

However, the same blockchain technology that makes NFTs possible could also provide a solution. DACS noted that the resale rights could be used to support artists making DTV or who have given permission to make DTV of their work. “Crucially, the artist’s resale right not only protects the creativity of the artist or his work, but it helps support the continued practice and livelihoods of artists, as well as ensuring that ‘they have a continuing interest in the growing value of their work. As art market players seek to make use of the new technologies available, we must ask ourselves: “How in the era of NFT can we ensure that artists’ rights in works of art are maintained?” ? “”

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“An Artist’s Dream:” The Silverthorne Art Board is interested in the creation of a community art center in the former fire station https://danhardingart.com/an-artists-dream-the-silverthorne-art-board-is-interested-in-the-creation-of-a-community-art-center-in-the-former-fire-station/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 22:30:00 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/an-artists-dream-the-silverthorne-art-board-is-interested-in-the-creation-of-a-community-art-center-in-the-former-fire-station/ The old Silverthorne Fire Station is pictured on Sunday, November 21. The Silverthorne Art Board has expressed interest in potentially transforming the building into a community arts center.Lindsey Toomer / Daily News Summit Silverthorne City Council met with the city’s art council on November 10 to discuss the possibility of creating an art center as […]]]>

The old Silverthorne Fire Station is pictured on Sunday, November 21. The Silverthorne Art Board has expressed interest in potentially transforming the building into a community arts center.
Lindsey Toomer / Daily News Summit

Silverthorne City Council met with the city’s art council on November 10 to discuss the possibility of creating an art center as part of the revitalized downtown, and council members have expressed keen interest in the old fire station of the city.

Director of Recreation and Culture Joanna Cook said that as the city seeks to expand the presence of art downtown, community members of the Silverthorne Art Board have stepped up to ensure that let that happen.

“This group is so excited about the potential and the opportunities downtown, and we know the only way the arts will be authentic is to do it from scratch with the people who live here,” Cook said.



As Fourth Street Crossing and conversations around Fourth North continue, the fate of the old fire station at the corner of Blue River Parkway and Fourth Street remains in question, and the Art Council is interested.

Arts Council member Cody Mendoza said many artists living in Silverthorne struggle to find their own creative spaces, and a collective and community art space can make artists feel welcome. .



“We have a thriving community, but finding real space to display and create? It’s a bit missing, ”Mendoza said.

While living in Wyoming, Arts Council member Lisa Hueneke ran an art center similar to the one the Council hopes to create in Silverthorne, and she’s already gone through the process of finding a new space.

“This space that we are looking for is really a catalyst for so many other things to bring artists together, to create space… to bring our community into this developing city center,” said Hueneke.

Cook said she has visited other art centers across the state and most have some sort of anchor retail or catering business to help pay some bills as well as co-op spaces for rent. for artists. But she said a space like this can work in a number of ways.

Hueneke said the Art Board is also interested in getting a designation from the Colorado Creative Arts District in Silverthorne and that an arts center is an essential part of being able to do so. She also said the location of a space like this is important and that the fire hall being in the middle of all new commercial developments would provide more opportunities for artists.

City Manager Ryan Hyland noted that there will be new retail space with the development of Fourth North and asked if the Fire Hall building is what the Art Council is most interested in or if it ‘is the location.

Pamela Churman, art board member, said she thought the fire station was magical, describing it as “an artist’s dream.” She also said there wouldn’t be much for the building to do to turn it into a functioning art center.

Nina Waters, art board member, said odd ’70s architecture and exposed brickwork gives artists an opportunity to make the space their own rather than stepping into a “whole new and sterile” environment. which does not inspire artistically.

“You give the artists a space of their own, and they’re going to take it to the moon,” Waters said. “… You give them something old that they can choose and reuse in any way – that’s a victory in my book.”

Cook reiterated the city’s motivation to save other old aspects of the city – as it did with the Old Dillon Inn and The Mint at Fourth Street Crossing – and said the Art Council is is also interested in the aesthetics of the new city center.

“When you talk about authenticity and bringing an old city center to life, it’s not always about razing everything and building anew, but what is left of life and what can be returned special? Cook said. “And when we walked through (the fire station) it was pretty clear that it looked like all the other art co-ops you go to in all the other towns. … They take old buildings and reuse them.

Council member Mike Spry noted that the city bought the building because it wanted to have a say in what is a key part of the city’s core.

Waters said a retail space would help energize the downtown area, but educational classes and other community programs would allow the space to thrive day and night. She also pointed out that the city would have control over how artists use the space and could ask them to teach a number of courses or gallery opening work, for example.

Council members were all thrilled to see the enthusiasm of the Art Council and asked members to come back to the Council with concrete plans on how they see the concept work. They also asked about other cities in Colorado that have set up these centers so that they can go and visit them.

“With the ideas we already have, this space could really be something special,” said Hueneke.


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LaFleur, star of “The Sandlot”, has died at 78 https://danhardingart.com/lafleur-star-of-the-sandlot-has-died-at-78/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 02:03:00 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/lafleur-star-of-the-sandlot-has-died-at-78/ LaFleur Art, famous for playing Babe Ruth in the classic baseball movie “The Sandlot”, died. The actor died Wednesday following a 10-year battle with Parkinson’s disease … according to his wife, Shelley. We’re told he passed away at his home surrounded by his children and Shelley – and despite being in hospice care, Art was […]]]>


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The concept and 3D art of Forza Horizon 5 from Playground Games https://danhardingart.com/the-concept-and-3d-art-of-forza-horizon-5-from-playground-games/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:05:00 +0000 https://danhardingart.com/the-concept-and-3d-art-of-forza-horizon-5-from-playground-games/ Forza Horizon 5 is fun as hell, but I think the main reason there are so many more people outnumbering the last entry in the series is the way it looks. Not in terms of the number of polygons on the screen, but just atmosphere of it. Mexico is a beautiful country, but the parts […]]]>

Forza Horizon 5 is fun as hell, but I think the main reason there are so many more people outnumbering the last entry in the series is the way it looks. Not in terms of the number of polygons on the screen, but just atmosphere of it.

Mexico is a beautiful country, but the parts shown in this game, and the way they are shown, really makes driving fast cars through the countryside like a fantastic vacation. Sometimes when combined with the writing and overall tone of the game it can bit a lot – veering uncomfortably close to Far cry levels of tropical voyeurism, but overall it’s just a wonderful thing to watch whether you’re driving 200mph or standing perfectly still on the asphalt.

We can thank Playground Games and the artists who worked on the game for that, so it’s going to be really cool tonight to watch a bunch of art that went into the creation of the game.

Below you will see a selection of works by some of the artists responsible for FH5 see. Not everyone worked on everything, but it’s enough to give all of us a good idea of ​​the kinds of things that formed the building blocks of the game world.

You will find links to each artist’s portfolio in their names below, and even more rooms to FH5 from ArtStation Artistic explosion.


NICK ELLIOTT

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MICHAEL RICHARD

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NICK CONTREMAN

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VAIGINTAS PAKENIS

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ALEX LOGAN

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BREWER JENNY

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RYAN VARDY

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SCOTT NECKLACE

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ALEX KILLPACK

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READ MORE:

Forza 5 Horizon: Kotaku Review

The implicit promise of Forza Horizon is in the name. You see something on the horizon, you can get to it. Skyrim with cars. Far cry with more cars and no guns. Forza Horizon 5, the latest game in the venerable Xbox racing series, is no more and no less than that promise: just bigger, brighter, and therefore so much more beautiful than its predecessors.

Forza Horizon 5 finally steals the show from Microsoft

The final game in the open world spinoff series and the 13th Forza play on everything, Forza Horizon 5 is a widely known amount. But nearly a decade after the Horizon series has started, it looks like many are meeting him for the first time. And they love it, in a way that sucks all the oxygen out of the room in a way racing games rarely do.


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